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Exercise, Group Division

Priorities Matrix + Comparison Matrix

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2 simple and practical tools to prioritize the most important topics to focus on them, give space to youth to participate with their opinion and discuss.
Democratic and convincing tools for all at end

Aims of the tool

To help out youth workers to identify the most priority topic to work on it with youth

To include the young people in the decision of what needs, problems, issues, etc they want to work on them

Increase the level of participation by young people to work on more related issue to them

To realize the differences between topics/subjects in a very practical and convincing tool

Description of the tool

Methodology:
Workshop: apply examples from the youth field and work on them using both tools/ or one of them

Step by step process:
For the priorities matrix:
- Doing instruction on how participants may select the topics, and how to give the topics scores according the items in the matrix
- 2-4 groups work separately to agree on number of topics from the field they think they are important needs for the young people
- Each group work to agree on the average score for each item until all finish scoring their topics
- The topic which gets higher score in total; it would be the most important need to work on it with youth
- In case there are equal scores, then we may add another item to measure the topic according it

For the comparison matrix:
- Doing instruction on how participants may select the topics, and how to compare the topics with each other using the matrix
- 2-4 groups work separately to agree on the most important topics they think they are important needs for the young people
- Each group should write down the selected topics in the matrix horizontally and vertically (in the yellow spaces)
- Then participants start to compare one by one: one from the above row with one from the right column (black cells should be left blank)

Outcomes:
- Participants are able to use new tool to select the most important topic/ needed to work with youth on it
- Participants include the young people to take a part in the decision on which topics they want to work, which means higher level of participation
- By using these matrixes with young people; it would provide them with a logical reasons of why they should work on the selected topics
- Discussions would be raised during such activities between youth workers and young people/ or target group; and that would enrich the value of selecting the most important topics.
it is most related to their needs, concerns, etc.

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Disclaimer

SALTO cannot be held responsible for the inappropriate use of these training tools. Always adapt training tools to your aims, context, target group and to your own skills! These tools have been used in a variety of formats and situations. Please notify SALTO should you know about the origin of or copyright on this tool.

Tool overview

Priorities Matrix + Comparison Matrix

http://toolbox.salto-youth.net/1317

This tool is for

youth and community workers 10-15 persons or more

and addresses

EuroMed, Youth Initiatives, Project Management, Youth Participation

It is recommended for use in:

Training and Networking

Materials needed:

LCD projector to show on screen or wall
A4 papers
pens

Duration:

60 minutes

Behind the tool

The tool was created by

NA

in the context of

Human Rights Education

The tool has been experimented in

it was used in Advocacy Campaigns to select most priority topics to advocate for on local level

The tool was published to the Toolbox by

Shadi Zatara (on 1 October 2014)

and last modified

23 November 2011

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